The Top 4 Social Media Penalties

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By Julia Prior

With the Super Bowl this afternoon, don’t find yourself committing a social media penalty. Here are the top four.

Illegal Formation: A tweet that has more than 140 characters, more than 3 hashtags or is too vague for the average person to comprehend.

Messaging is key on social media platform, but so is execution. It takes skill and strategy to communicate and contextualize your message in a quick, engaging and thoughtful manner.

Offsides: Retweeting a story you haven’t fully read. Always do your research and get the back story, and don’t just share things because the people you follow are sharing it.

What if there’s a point in the story that your company doesn’t fundamentally agree with? Read, research and strategize before sharing or posting anything. I cannot stress this enough.

Unsportsmanlike Conduct: Also known as trolling. Purposely commenting, posting or tweeting in a way to elicit a negative reaction from others and either de-rail a current discussion topic or to bring attention to your own brand by hijacking your competitor’s community. This can also be exhibited by brands who use hashtags and topics in their tweets to show up in trending searches.

Just don’t. It’s poor form, and frankly it’s very rude. You wouldn’t drop into a conversation in real life and immediately change the subject to yourself, so don’t do it online.

Helmet – to – Helmet Collision: Attempting to address and resolve a customer complaint directly in a public forum. If a customer takes to social media with a complaint, offer to contact them privately to discuss, either through a Twitter direct message, email, or even better, a phone call. Always offer your information first. Example:

mortons

Morton’s addresses the customer directly, in a timely manner (this replay was time stamped only 3 hours after the original comment was made) and offered another medium to hear additional grievances, with the promise to look into the issue.

 

UPDATE: 

Power Outage: Going dark and not posting for an extended period of time.

Social media is a relationship tool. You wouldn’t neglect any of your other relationships for an extended period of time, would you?

 

What do you think the biggest social media penalties are?

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How to Be a PR Rockstar at Tradeshows

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By Robyn Brown

The Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is fast approaching and if you’re lucky enough to attend 1) mail me tickets and 2) check out my event reminder list below.

Here are just a few tips and tricks I’ve collected from attending conferences over the years that helped me exceed client expectations. I’d love to hear what’s worked for you as well.

  • Bring your camera, and if possible video camera. It’s not always the job of the PR pro to take photos at the event but, it’s a detail you can’t miss. Take photos of your company’s tradeshow booth with key personnel, your spokesperson speaking with a reporter (with the reporter’s permission), your company presenter whether in a demo, breakout session or keynote, and attendees standing in front of your company logo on a backdrop.

With video you can capture short (two minute or less) segments with your spokesperson or even customer speaking about your news and your company’s role at the event. Share photos and video on social media channels like Facebook and YouTube – the sooner the better – and include the event hash tags so attendees can find you.

  • Connect with media on Twitter after an interview. While preparing for the event, be sure to locate the reporter’s Twitter handle. Then, write a quick tweet to the reporter after they’ve met with your spokesperson to thank them for their time. You can even include a URL to your company’s news posted on your website. Example below:

tweet

  • Make full use of your time. You may find a few hours in between interviews, appointments and checking back in at the office. During these moments, feel free to take a swig of water, munch a power bar and take a quick breather. When appropriate, you can also pitch in to help your non-PR colleagues – relieve someone manning the booth and help answer questions from prospective customers, help your company presenter prepare for his upcoming speech, or even re-fill the tchotchkes (small giveaways) on the booth table. These folks may even remember your goodwill when you need something from them later.

I’ve also used my ‘down time’ to learn more about an industry – especially if it’s highly technical or new to me. The first time I attended the Society of Exploration Geophysicists annual conference, I asked a geologist to explain in simple terms how he used my client’s software to display 3D seismic views of deep sub-sea resources – something I had written about but wanted to understand first hand. Not only did I get a good perspective, but I gained a contact that provided a use case and quotes for a future bylined article. David Carriere, a frequent collaborator, also suggests working the tradeshow floor to do a little of your own market research, and observe how your colleagues are handling their own publicity efforts. (From David’s 2008 book, Publicity: 7 Steps to Publicize Just About Anything).

  • Hang out near the press room. While I’m not a media stalker, it does make sense to casually be outside the reporter hangout when you can. You may chance upon a reporter who you were unable to speak with prior to the event. If this happens, strike up a genial conversation, make sure they have your company news and offer the chance to speak directly to your spokesperson. You may score 20 minutes of their time for an interview or, at the very least, you’ve strengthened a relationship with some face-to-face time.

For many of us, participation at trade shows and conferences are spread throughout the year, allowing months in between to prepare for each one. For others though, there may be a three-month window in your industry called tradeshow season where one event comes directly after another. When you represent multiple clients, your calendars can even overlap over multiple seasons. Earlier this year, I attended three conferences over a month and half period for two clients in different industries. Talk about changing gears! It’s also not unheard of to wrap up press release approvals and book interviews for an upcoming event while attending another. Done that one, too!

Seasoned public relations pros are experts at multi-tasking and supporting the strategies for multiple projects and accounts. We can pull together materials for our PR kits, brainstorm messaging 1:1 with an executive, make sure everyone in the press room has seen the client’s news, and ensure that reporters show up for an interview when they’ve promised – all while overseeing the bigger picture of our PR objectives. While there’s always a set of standard PR activities at any conference, take the time to consider how to go the extra step for your company’s media and marketing efforts.

7 Things You’re Doing Wrong on Social Media

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By Julia Prior

There is no denying that social media has fundamentally changed the way we communicate. It has opened up so many ways for us to keep in touch with our friends, family and, more significantly, our customers.

But there are right and wrong ways to do everything and the same holds true in social media.

1.       Not linking your posts to other pages.

When you mention another page, person or entity in your social media posts, make sure to link back to their page. On Facebook, make sure to put @ before their name, and select them from the drop down menu that will appear. On Twitter, make sure to research the correct handle and use that in your post. A lot of times it will save characters, and all the time it will help your brand reach to other users. It also helps you develop a relationship with the brand. And isn’t that what social media is all about?

2.       Linking your Twitter and Facebook feeds.

Yes, it is very easy, and efficient to link Facebook and Twitter and only have to post once. But Facebook and Twitter are completely different networks with completely different audiences and different engagement metrics. A few words and a shortened link work well on Twitter, but falls flat on Facebook. Take the time to rework your message, add in a couple details and tailor the link for the network.

Also, on Facebook, make sure to delete the link out of your post after the preview pops up. You wouldn’t say “Visit this Link. Visit this Link” so why are you putting more than one link in your post?

3.       Blatantly asking for people to “LIKE this if you agree” or “COMMENT with your favorite story”.

I read a fantastic post over on PR Breakfast Club about this. It’s pretty simple. If you create great content, you won’t need to ask for engagement.  True, it’s an easy way to get interaction and feedback from your audience. And yes, it’s a good tool to have in your arsenal, but don’t make it the backbone of your social media strategy.

4.       Not having a strategy.

We are communicators. Every word we write has layers of strategy behind it. So why don’t your social media posts have that same background? Every post should get you closer to your goals and you should know how it is going to do that.

5.       Liking your own Facebook posts.

Why would you skew your metrics and numbers by liking your own post? To get true engagement metrics, you need to know how many of your fans are interacting with your content, not how many of your employees are doing so.

6.       Automating all of your posts.

Scheduling posts has its time and place. It makes it easy to post on evenings and weekends when engagement is higher, and it streamlines the whole process. But again, don’t let it be your go to move. Social media is meant to be spontaneous and organic. Your audience wants to know they are interacting with a real person, not a machine.

And if you do schedule posts, please keep an eye on what’s trending and what’s going on in the news. You don’t want to be that brand putting out a promotional message amongst a stream of posts about Hurricane Sandy. Not only does it make you look uninformed, but it makes you look insensitive as well.

7.       Only sharing your own content.

It’s important to share your own content, yes. But it should not be in every post you make. Be sure to interact with customers and partners online as well. We always tell clients for every one post about yourself, you should have three others promoting someone else or building a relationship with someone else.

What else do brands do wrong on social media?

Stop SOPA

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Imagine a world without Google, You Tube, WordPress or Wikipedia. No blogging, easy research tools or online entertainment. Businesses could fail. Teachers would be limited on their resources. Free speech wouldn’t exist. Life would get harder for those of us who spend plenty of time using the Internet daily.

Well, this is SOPA and PIPA.

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) draw in much criticism from Americans claiming these laws violate “free and open Internet.” If passed by Congress, these laws could shut down websites without a court hearing, make patrons vulnerable to Internet hacking, deplete our free speech, and overall damage businesses (even non-profits). This type of censorship is practiced in China, Iran and Syria.

Check out AmericanCensorship.com for graphics on the “Internet Blacklist Bill.”

Websites such as Google, Wikipedia and a handful of others are blacking out their websites today. It’s time to take action and step up for our liberties. Sign the Google petition here- www.google.com/landing/takeaction

And the winner is….

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Our agency launched our first social media contest in December 2011 to promote a client’s new book. Our client Kristin Kaufman, founder and CEO of  Alignment, Inc., recently published her first book, Is This Seat Taken?. As our PR team promoted Kristin’s book to local and national media, we took the social media approach to create additional buzz.

On our Twitter page (@BrooksPR) we asked followers to visit the Brooks360 agency blog to read the official rules and then compose a tweet about how random encounters can play an important role in one’s life.

After a week of collecting tweets, one winner was chosen. Huong Vo, a communications graduate of the University of North Texas and social media enthusiast, won by tweeting:

@BrooksPR #RandomEncounters affect our lives in many ways. Big or small, they can change your life: getting a job, finding love, etc.

 

Congratulations, Huong! (picture above) Thank you to all who entered the contest.

For more information on Is This Seat Taken?, please visit the official website.

Share your own random encounter, book review, or make a purchase on Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

Follow us on Twitter! @BrooksPR