Facebook Changes and How They Affect Your Brand

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By Julia Prior, Account Coordinator

Facebook released a set of changes to several of its features this week. One of these includes a change in the news feed algorithm that could help posts that were missed by a user get a second chance at engagement. Additionally, Facebook has begun to experiment with the idea of “trending topics” much like the similarly named Twitter feature.

The third and final change is the official roll out of the much talked about Graph Search feature, which allows users to search for more specific things inside Facebook, such as “Friends who Attended X College” or “People who work for X Company” or even “Friends who like X brand and live in X city”

The below graphic, shown at a special event hosted by Facebook this week, shows the network’s new focus on three of its services.

facebook-3-pillars


News Feed Updates

Facebook will add the news feed update to its current EdgeRank algorithm, but the most distinctive difference is that previously, each time a user refreshed their feed, new stories would automatically populate the top of the feed – even if they had a lower EdgeRank score than the stories previously displayed. The change in the ranking process now allows older stories that may have been posted earlier in the day but the user has not seen – to join the “new” stories at the top of their feed.

For example, if your brand posted something early in the morning that got a good amount of engagement, it has a chance to reappear on your fans’ news feeds later in the day, and get another boost from that second appearance.

This just reiterates that the focus of any good social media strategy needs to be based in good content that tells a story. The better the content, the more engagement the post will receive the first time around, and the more engagement it receives, the higher the chance of it reappearing at the top of a user’s feed.

Trending Topics

Facebook’s decision to utilize its new hashtag feature and experiment with Trending Topics opens a gateway for brands to join conversations and customize their content to suit what people on Facebook are talking about.

One of the biggest complaints people have about branded content on Facebook is that it is not relevant or it is not content the user is interested in. The new trending topic feature is a way to see what kind of content the majority of Facebook users want to see, because they are already talking about it.

Before, brands would simply use educated guesses about popular holidays, tv shows and news items to customize their content and hope that those topics were of interest to their fans. Now they will be able to tell what users on Facebook are talking about at that very moment, and will be able to use that information to ensure that they put out relevant content.

Facebook-Graph-Search

Click the image to enlarge.

Graph Search

While Graph Search has been available to some users on Facebook for some time now, Facebook has begun what they refer to as the official roll out of the feature to U.S. accounts. This new search function effectively allows a user to search for any single thing on the site – at least the things they would normally have access to anyway. Users can search for anything within the Facebook network and receive personalized results based on their friends.

While this does not directly impact your brand, it is a feature to keep an eye on, as it opens the door for new sponsored opportunities within Facebook. Not only that, but Graph Search makes pages more discoverable. A user can search for a “consulting firm in X city” and find new pages and companies that way.

Additionally, for brands, Graph Search puts even more emphasis on images. Graph Search can reveal photos and images in albums from pages and user photos where the brand is tagged – putting focus on photo albums (not wall photos) and user-generated content.

So What Can You Do?

It is important to know about these changes while writing your social media strategy. Knowing about these changes before and during their initial roll out will allow your brand to be ahead of the curve in adapting to the new way Facebook is operating. It allows you to have precious time to discuss a strategy and create content optimized to take advantage of these new marketing tools.

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Creating Killer Visual Content for B2B Brands

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By Julia Prior, Account Coordinator

The verdict is in – compelling content in the digital age comes in the form of images. And it makes sense because images are an eye-catching way to convey information, feelings and news in an easy to digest and relatable manner.

But how does all this work for B2B companies?

Often a major strategy in a B2B plan is to position the employees and executives as thought leaders and trusted experts on the company’s particular topic. Images are a creative way to disseminate this kind of information to the general public.

Southern Methodist University Cox Executive Education (client) uses images like this one to share thought leadership in order to promote its programs that help professionals grow in leadership and management roles.

Southern Methodist University Cox Executive Education (client) uses images like this one to share thought leadership.

By sharing a quote or industry insight on its own, you may gain a few customers that read it and think about it. But people are more likely to read and engage with the content if it is presented not only in short and sweet “snackable” sizes, but in a graphically creative way.

Instead of just sharing a headline or quote from an article, try pulling a sound bite sized learning out and creating an image out of it. You can then use the image to post to social media, or even use as an embedded picture with the article in a publication or on your website or blog.

The key here is to make the content interesting. Support your executives’ brilliant articles and thought leadership pieces with compelling images that help tell the story.

The easiest way to do this is to simply impose a quote or learning from the article into an image, as shown here. This gives readers a quality look at topics and draws them into the article. Make them want to read more.

High resolution images of your company’s product can also be used to this effect. If you work in technology, use the images to back up any claims you’re making.

Paradigm, Ltd (client) uses product images to demonstrate the capabilities of its software for geological exploration and reservoir characterization of oilfields.

Paradigm, Ltd (client) uses product images to demonstrate the capabilities of its software for geological exploration and reservoir characterization of oilfields.

Get creative with your visuals. Showing your product on its own is nice, but to really add weight and credibility to the image, try using a picture of someone using your product. Pair this with a quote from your executives or customers about the product or technology, and you’ve got a compelling image to use practically anywhere.

In addition to small, snackable sized images, give some thought to using the research your company has no doubt done to create your own infographic. By teaching the reader something unique about your industry, and supporting your claims and products with data and facts, you earn the readers trust and become an expert in their mind. Infographics are also a great way to show how your customers are benefiting directly by using your product or service.

Lastly, don’t forget the fun side. Take pictures at conferences and events, even around the office. Office birthdays and special events provide a chance to show your customers and the world what kind of personality your brand has. Give a peek behind the curtain every once in a while and allow your Facebook fans or Twitter followers a glimpse at what your company does at conferences or events.

Images are a great way to tell your brand story not only through social media, but to make your website, blog posts and contributed articles more interesting. As long as they are high resolution, professional in appearance and relevant to your overall messaging goals, images can be a great way to draw more attention to quality content, which will in turn draw attention to your brand’s product or services.

What kind of visual elements do you use to tell your brand’s story?